“I Wish I’d Known…”: Advice for Debut Authors, Part 2

Members of the Sweet Sixteens share what they’ve learned in their debut year.

Read Part 1.

Kristy Acevedo, author of Consider and Contribute

Kristy Acevedo   Kristy Acevedo Consider   contribute

Find her online at kristyacevedo.com

“I wish I had known how exhausting and amazing publishing my debut book would be. Since I teach high school full-time, I wasn’t prepared for how much additional time would be spent on things like editing, marketing, and emailing. I learned how crucial it is how to manage my personal time to de-stress and enjoy the journey. Also, the relationships I made with other writers were absolutely essential in surviving the rough times.”

 

Melanie Conklin, author of Counting Thyme

Melanie_conklin   COUNTING THYME

Find her online at www.melanieconklin.com

“I wish I’d known that the writing community is so supportive of debut authors. Do not be shy about reaching out to established authors as you figure out the ropes of being an author. You’re not alone, even though it may feel like it at times. Publishing is a team sport!”

 

Christian McKay Heidicker, author of Cure for the Common Universe

Christian McKay Heidicker    Cure for the Common Universe

Find him online at www.cmheidicker.com

“I wish I’d known to start working on your next project as soon as possible. The day after that final draft is turned in. There are rough waters ahead. No matter how successful you are. There will be bad reviews. There will be repetitive questions. Having another arrow in your quiver is the best way to distract yourself. If you get a bad review, fine. You’ve got something different on the way. If you get bogged down describing your book for the 217th time, you’ll still have a spark in your eye. Something more exciting is on the way.”

 

Robin Reul, author of My Kind of Crazy

Robin Reul   mY KIND OF CRAZY

Find her online at www.robinreul.com

“I wish I’d known that marketing my book was like a full-time job all by itself, especially while trying to simultaneously write my next one. You can’t solely rely on your publisher to promote your book and getting the word out in person and on social media via interviews, blog posts, Facebook, Twitter, etc. can be extremely time consuming and costly. It’s helpful to focus on outlets that will get you the largest exposure and to be discerning with your energies so you don’t lose your ability to focus on your writing!”

 

Robin Yardi, author of The Midnight War of Mateo Martinez

Robin Yardi   WAR

Find her online at robinyardi.com

“I wish I’d known that I wouldn’t know what I wish I had known. That after a book with good reviews and awards I would still feel like a beginner. That writing the second book would feel as hard as the first, but that it wouldn’t matter, because I’d do it anyway. Write that next hard book. Writers are like crazy marathon runners. Not the one and done kind, but the kind that run a race or two every year for the rest of our lives. While our intellectual tendons creak and our emotional toes turn black, we keep writing.”

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s